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mentor picture Yating Haller
 
Yating Haller
Assistant Director
Global Engineering Program, Purdue University
Having been born in Taiwan and growing up in Singapore, Yating has had the opportunity to experience different cultures on the first-hand basis. Earning the reputation of “The Global Nomad”, she decided to leave Asia and come to... Having been born in Taiwan and growing up in Singapore, Yating has had the opportunity to experience different cultures on the first-hand basis. Earning the reputation of “The Global Nomad”, she decided to leave Asia and come to the United States for her postsecondary education. At the University of Oregon, Chang earned a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Public Relations in 1999, followed by a Master of Science in Cross-Cultural Psychology. Her research interests include the differences and similarities between individualism and collectivism as well as small group dynamics. Despite her heavy involvement in a wide-array of extra curriculur activities, Yating finds the single most important experience in her education to be the semester she studied abroad in Vienna, Austria. Upon graduation, Yating accepted a position as a full-time study abroad advisor at Western Kentucky University from 2001 to 2006. She supported and provided oversight for all study abroad functions and initiatives on campus. Simultaneously, Yating is pursuing a Doctoral degree at the Peabody College at Vanderbilt University in Higher Education Leadership and Policy. Currently, she works as the Assistant Director of the Global Engineering Program within the College of Engineering at Purdue University. The Global Engineering Program aims to increase the level of internationalization and overseas study opportunities for engineering majors.

Responses

  1. I would tell them that this is a once-a-life-time opportunity that they didn't have when they were young, and we are in it together to make it happen for students. When talking to students parents, it is very important to acknowledge their feelings and highlight the health and safety part. I always tell them that I won't send their child to a place that I won't send my own kids. They need to know that you are with them and understand how they feel, not some sort of marketer trying to fool their babies. Finance is always on the top of the parents' question list. Be honest and sincere. I always point to myself and tell them that my mother took the step of faith to send me overseas, and look how I've turned out!
    1 answers – Before You Leave
  2. Faculty and administrators should be sensitive to the fact that not all students have the same playing fields. Students with diverse backgrounds often have different levels of access to cultural and social capital than a typical student, and it often takes more one-on-one interaction to get to know them. Faculty members should also keep in mind that discrimination and prejudice still exist and are very real even in today's society. They should address these issues up front and make sure that students know that they can discuss such issues with the faculty members if needed.
    9 answers – For African Americans – For Asian/ Pacific Americans – For Hispanic/ Latin@ – For Native Americans
  3. They are about to embark on a soul searching emotional roller-coaster ride!! I would advise students to read as much about their cultural roots and history as possible before the trip, and try to examine what they experience overseas using many sets of lenses. Students should understand that whatever they encounter in a country of their heritage ---The good, the bad, and even the ugly --- has some significance in defining the way they are and understanding why things are done the way they are! As long as students maintain an open mind, it should be very interesting for them!!
    4 answers – For African Americans – For Asian/ Pacific Americans – For Hispanic/ Latin@ – For Native Americans
  4. You are your best tool!!! Students look up to faculty members and are often interested to find out more about who you are as a person. I have students come to me and ask timidly: So where are you from? Sometimes I actively share my background as my students are too afraid to ask or are scared that they may offend me. Your classroom is the perfect stage and don't be afraid to disclose a little more about yourself. Multiculturalism can be taught by you demonstrating that we all have differences, but we can live and communicate with each other through tolerance and understanding.
    1 answers – For Asian/ Pacific Americans
  5. During a study abroad fair at my former institution an African American student and her mother were walking by and I engaged them in conversation about studying abroad. It was clear that the student had interest but her mother had serious concerns. I did not let her go at that time. I gave her my card and ask her to drop by my office for a chat. We did not talk about study abroad programs at all, but just life in general. We had a lovely 30 minute chat, and I remember thinking, "This is great, it has been a long time since I sat down and REALLY got to know a student, rather then just process the students through the advising session. I became her mentor, and she started to hang out at my office quite a bit. Of course, her interest for study abroad grew stronger as she saw me interacting with other participants. I asked her mom to give me a call (relaying the message through the student) and had a good chat with her mom over the phone. The student ended up studying at Kansai Gaidai University in Japan, and had a wonderful growing experience. Sometimes, it really takes one student at a time.
    6 answers – For African Americans – For Asian/ Pacific Americans – For Hispanic/ Latin@ – For Native Americans
  6. Before jumping to the conclusion that your parents would not allow it, at least try to bring up the subject casually. Many parents are not against the idea of study abroad, but rather they are intimidated by it as you may be the first in the family attending college. So students actually play a big role in educating parents of the reason why they want to study abroad and what it is all about. Be prepared to answer questions that your family may have about it in a positive way. Discuss the details and ensure your parents that study abroad is beneficial for your future.
    5 answers – For African Americans – For Asian/ Pacific Americans – For Hispanic/ Latin@ – For Native Americans
  7. Plan early! Students in the stem disciplines are limited, first and foremost, by their curriculum structure. If students can learn to plan early and determine which semester they want to go study abroad, it can greatly help the, to reduce the time to graduation. Summer opportunities are also one great way to go study abroad for these students. It would be killing two birds with one stone if students can work, intern, volunteers abroad for experiences that are relevant to their majors.
    1 answers – Personal – Career
  8. I was born in Taiwan, grew up in Singapore, and have traveled to china many times, so I guess my enterprise is in Asian cultures. I highly encourage students to embrace and learn the East Asian languages and cultures. China will be the next super power ( already is!) in terms of engineering and manufacturing. It is not only fun, but practical, to a future STEM student"s career to learn about Chinese cultures.
    2 answers – While Abroad – Personal
  9. Think outside of the box!! There are pots of money on various campus offices that are not designated until you ask for it. Also, the advantage of internship abroad allows students to get the biggest bang for their buck, they may event earn some money on their trip abroad.
    6 answers – How to pay
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