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Mentor Profile

Bio

mentor picture Janeth
 
Janeth
Junior Year Student
Loyola Marymount University
I am a junior at Loyola Marymount University majoring in Business Administration with an emphasis in marketing. I am a resident of Los Angeles and have lived in North Hollywood my whole life. Both of my parents were born and... I am a junior at Loyola Marymount University majoring in Business Administration with an emphasis in marketing. I am a resident of Los Angeles and have lived in North Hollywood my whole life. Both of my parents were born and raised in El Salvador before moving to California in the late seventies. I am first of my family to attend a university and pursue a bachelor’s degree. I grew up in a Spanish speaking home and so when I was looking for a study abroad program I decided to visit a Spanish speaking country. I decided on Madrid, Spain and was very glad with my decision. I had an unforgettable experience and really had the opportunity to immerse myself in the culture by living with a host family. Throughout the semester, I had the opportunity to visit other European cities like Paris, London, Lisbon and Tenerife. Each city was a new adventure and offered me a glimpse of what the world has to offer and how different each place is. It was a great experience and living in a Spanish speaking country has encouraged me to pursue a minor in Spanish. Studying abroad was an amazing experience and I am really glad I took the opportunity to go abroad. My semester abroad has motivated me to continue traveling and explore new places and meet new people.

Responses

  1. It may be difficult to readjust to life back home but spending time with family and friends really helps in the transition. To help me readjust, I spent time with friends and visited places that I could not find while studying abroad. Surrounding yourself with familiar things will also help you get back in the rhythm of life back home.
    2 answers – Re-Adjusting to Home
  2. Normally the school will determine which host family you will be assigned to, but that does not mean you do not have any say in it. In my case, the school e-mailed the profile of five host families describing the area they lived in, who lived in the house, if it was a smoking or non- smoking residence, whether there was an internet connection and any other information.. After this, I was given the option to number them from my first choice to the last. The school has the final say but in some cases, you will at least have an idea of where you may be living before your host family is assigned to you.
    1 answers – Housing
  3. I studied in Madrid, Spain and I felt safe living and traveling throughout the country. I heard lots of stories about people’s purses or wallets being stolen so I was always aware of my belongings but I never had a problem. Like most big cities, you always have to be aware of your surroundings and it is always a good idea to travel with another person in case of any trouble. I wandered around the city by myself occasionally, but it is always important to be ware of your surroundings and when in a crowded area make sure to hold on to your belongings.
    9 answers – Deciding On A Program – Gender – Safety Issues – While Abroad
  4. It is important to have a fair amount of knowledge of the country you will be studying in. I would recommend buying a travel guide just so you become familiar with the culture and you will have some tips on what to visit and how to get around. If you will be studying in a country that speaks a language you are unfamiliar with, I would recommend learning some key phrases just to make things easier for yourself. Having some knowledge before leaving will help you prepare for studying abroad and it may also lessen any culture shock.
    7 answers – For African Americans – For Asian/ Pacific Americans – For Hispanic/ Latin@ – Before You Leave – For Native Americans
  5. Depending on your bank, withdrawing cash from an ATM may be the most effective way of providing cash for your son or daughter. Some banks have partner banks abroad and through them you can withdraw money without any non-bank fees. There may still a conversion fee, however credit cards also work well but make sure to check with your bank to see if there are any additional fees for international purchases. Travelers’ checks are also a good option; if you lose the check you can report it and be refunded the money. I would recommend checking with your bank and seeing if they have partner banks abroad and if so, ATM may be the best and cheapest way to provide money to your child. Credit cards would be good for bigger purchases, but for everyday things, it is important to have cash on hand.
    3 answers – How to pay
  6. Yes, I made some good friends while studying abroad and we keep in touch through e-mail, facebook and occasionally letters. Despite the fact that we live in different parts of the U.S., we keep in touch and hope to see each other to have a little reunion.
    3 answers – Re-Adjusting to Home
  7. The best way to keep in contact would have to be through e-mail, instant messaging or through Skype. Skype allows you to talk to another person through your computer. It’s a good program that you can download for free. The quality varies though. If your son or daughter has a cell phone abroad that is another good way to keep in touch but it may be somewhat expensive to keep making international calls. Overall though, e-mail is the best way because you can e-mail when ever you want to, and considering the time difference sometimes it is difficult to call or Skype your son or daughter.
    5 answers – While Abroad
  8. It all depends on where you will be abroad. I studied in Madrid and there were a couple of gyms around and the school offered a special deal to students who wanted to become members for the semester. But I also found that there are many parks that you can jog through. So depending where you are, you may find some exercise facilities but don’t rule out jogging outdoors.
    3 answers – Health
  9. There are very few opportunities where you’ll have the opportunity to live in another country without any real responsibilities besides your school work. It is a completely new experience and even though at first it may seem daunting at the end it is completely worth it. Your friends and family will be back when you arrive and throughout your time abroad there are many ways to keep in touch. Not only will you make new friends but you discover a whole new country and have an unforgettable experience.
    4 answers – Before You Leave
  10. It depends on what country you will be studying abroad. You school should give you that information. If not look up the country consulate online to determine where there offices are. For some this may require them to travel to a different city in order to apply for their visa.
    1 answers – Before You Leave
  11. As soon as you know you will be traveling abroad would be ideal but if you decided to wait you should do it at least 3 months in advance. Sometimes the process can be long or it may take a while for the passport to be sent to you, so earlier is always better. It's better to be safe than sorry when it comes to getting your passport because without it, you’ll be stuck in the states.
    1 answers – Before You Leave
  12. Make sure to have a budget that you can stick to. It’s important to prioritize what you want to do so you won’t spend money on anything unnecessary. Another good idea is to remember when you are shopping that you’re going to have to bring it back home and to think whether you really have space for it in your luggage. This may actually help prevent you from buying unnecessary items. Also it may be wise to invest in an International Student Identity Card (ISIC) which can save you money in traveling and expenses. Depending on where you will be studying abroad, it may be helpful.
    6 answers – Budgeting
  13. It depends on where exactly you would be studying abroad, but most of the time I still feel you may be seen as a foreigner. It really varies from person to person. Just the way you speak Spanish may set you apart, but I really do not see that as a problem. I studied in Madrid and people knew that I was not Spanish but it was never a problem rather it made people interested in my background. I think you need to realize that even as a Latino in a Hispanic country you may still be considered a foreigner and there is nothing wrong with that.
    3 answers – For Hispanic/ Latin@
  14. The whole experience was amazing and so it is difficult to just pick one moment! One thing I enjoyed was the opportunity to travel to another country so easily. Being in Europe, all the countries surrounding Spain are relatively close. It was this ease of traveling that allowed me to explore other European cities, if only for a long weekend. I loved my trips to London, Paris, Lisbon and the Canary Islands. They were all amazing and of course traveling with my new friends added to the overall experience.
    7 answers – Personal
  15. This depends on what kind of program you will be attending, whether it is part of your school or an affiliate program. If the program is through your school then all of your aid should apply. If it is an affiliate program then some aid may apply but not all. To be sure, check with your study abroad office and the financial aid office. In my case, I went with a program from my school and all my aid transferred.
    4 answers – How to pay
  16. By the end of my freshmen year, I decided that I wanted to study abroad. I started looking into it my sophomore year and considered going my second semester of sophomore year. At the end, I decided to study abroad the first semester of my junior year. At the end of my sophomore year, I went through the paperwork and applied for the program. I was accepted into the program and during the summer, I applied for my visa and started preparing for my semester abroad.
    6 answers – Personal
  17. Since I was a child, my parents liked to travel and so I became interested in traveling from an early age. I grew up in a Salvadorian background, in a very diverse city, and had friends from many other ethnicities, so I was always curious about other cultures. As I grew older, I knew that I wanted to travel and explore more of the world. I knew that I would be able to do this and more through studying abroad. It was an excellent opportunity to see new parts of the world, experience a new culture and learn a new language.
    9 answers – Personal
  18. Normally the school will determine what host family you will be assigned to, but that does not mean you do not have any say in it. In my case, the school e-mailed the profile of five host families describing the area they lived in, who lived in the house, if it was a smoking or non- smoking residence, whether there was an internet connection and any other information.. After this, I was given the option to number them from my first choice to the last. The school has the final say but in some cases, you will at least have an idea of where you may be living before your host family is assigned to you.
    1 answers – Housing
  19. Debes planear el presupuesto tomando en cuenta cuánto realmente puedes gastar. Es importante que decidas de antemano qué es lo que quieres hacer durante tu estadía y que puedes dejar de hacer para así no gastar dinero en cosas innecesarias. Es recomendable pensar siempre en el hecho de que si lo compras, lo vas a tener que llevar a casa y puede ser que no quepa en tus maletas al final de tu estadía. Pensar de esta manera te ayudará a no gastar en todo lo que pudieras desear en el momento. Otra buena “inversión” que puedes hacer con tu dinero es comprar el carnet (tarjeta) de ISIC – International Student Identity Card - lo cual puede ayudarte a ahorrar dinero cuando viajes (con descuentos en transporte y entradas a los museos etc) y en otros gastos. Dependiendo del lugar adonde vayas, puede ser útil...
    2 respuestas – Como costear/financiar
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