Your Study Abroad Resource to Find Answers, Funding, and Programs

Mentor Advice

Question

How do you feel you were viewed abroad?

12 Replies from Mentors

  • mentor picture Jessica
     
    Jessica
    Graduate Student
    Loyola Marymount University



    Watch Jessica's reflections on how coming from a multi-racial background helped her to adapt to the environment abroad.
  • mentor picture Additional Mentor
     
    Additional Mentor
    Various students and administrators
    interviewed by the Center for Global Education


    Hai, Graduate Student
    Learn about this student’s experience as an Asian American in Germany.
  • mentor picture Additional Mentor
     
    Additional Mentor
    Various students and administrators
    interviewed by the Center for Global Education


    Adriana, Student
    Hear about this student’s feelings on being an Armenian American in Europe
  • mentor picture Additional Mentor
     
    Additional Mentor
    Various students and administrators
    interviewed by the Center for Global Education


    Jackie, Student
    This student talks about her positive experience in Europe following concerns about discrimination abroad.
  • mentor picture Kimberly
     
    Kimberly
    Senior Year Student
    Loyola Marymount University
    Studying abroad in China, I felt that the Chinese were extremely friendly and polite to everyone....
    Studying abroad in China, I felt that the Chinese were extremely friendly and polite to everyone. As a growing economy, which caters to more foreigners, China was very welcoming. I was treated similarly to the local people in certain aspects. Although I am not Chinese, most people thought that I was. Therefore, as an Asian American, the local people held expectations of me. They thought that I would know the language and some of the cultural traditions. Sometimes, these expectations were frustrating because they made it more difficult to communicate with the people in my classes, stores, restaurants, etc. It was especially hard in China to state my aggravations because the people barely speak English and it is looked down upon to deny societal norms of obedience and respect. When I would speak English with my “American accent” in a local environment, such as the streets, people would stare strangely at me. I found that my Asian American friends experienced these same expectations. My advice is to just be aware that if you look like a native citizen of the country, you will possibly have to encounter expectations being held of you.
  • mentor picture Nancy
     
    Nancy
    Senior Year Student
    Loyola Marymount University
    It was an advantage in Spain to not be the ‘typical’ blond haired, blue eyed American that people...
    It was an advantage in Spain to not be the ‘typical’ blond haired, blue eyed American that people think of. It was an advantage because I felt they don’t like Americans and it was a lot easier to blend in. In Italy I was believed to be a Spaniard. I never sensed any rudeness, didn’t feel it.
 
 
Sponsors
CEA Global Education
GlobaLinks Learning Abroad in Australia